Check the background of this financial professional on FINRA's BrokerCheck.
Terry L. Jordan

Nov
09
Risk Management and Your Retirement Savings Plan
By investing for retirement through your employer-sponsored plan, you are helping to manage a critically important financial risk: the chance that you will outlive your money. But choosing to participate is just one step in your financial risk management strategy. You also need to manage risk within your account to help it stay on track. Following are steps to consider. Familiarize yourself with the different types of risk All investments, even the most conservative, come with different types of risk. Understanding these risks will help you make educated choices in your retirement savings plan mix. Here are just a few. Market risk: The risk that your investment could lose value due to falling prices caused by outside forces, such...
Continue Reading »

Sep
07
Getting Help from a Financial Professional
Are you suddenly on your own or forced to assume greater responsibility for your financial future? Unsure about whether you're on the right track with your savings and investments? Finding yourself with new responsibilities, such as the care of a child or an aging parent? Facing other life events, such as marriage, divorce, the sale of a family business, or a career change? Too busy to become a financial expert but needing to make sure your assets are being managed appropriately? Or maybe you simply feel your assets could be invested or protected better than they are now. These are only some of the many circumstances that prompt people to contact someone who can help them address their financial questions and issues. This may be...
Continue Reading »

Jul
12
The Tax Benefits of Your Retirement Savings Plan
Taxes can take a big bite out of your total investment returns, so it's encouraging to know that your employer-sponsored retirement savings plan may offer a variety of tax benefits. Depending on the type of plan your employer offers, you may be able to benefit from current tax savings; tax deferral on any investment returns you earn on the road to retirement; and possibly even tax-free income in retirement. Lower your taxes now When you contribute to a traditional retirement savings plan, such as a 401(k) or 403(b), your plan contributions are deducted from your pay before income taxes are assessed. These "pretax contributions" reduce your current taxable income, which in turn reduces the amount of income tax you pay to Uncle Sam...
Continue Reading »

Jan
11
What to do after You've been automatically enrolled in your company's retirement plan
At one time, the only way you could join your company's 401(k) plan, 403(b) plan, or 457(b) plan was to put pen to paper and sign yourself up by filling out the appropriate forms. Now, though, in an effort to help participants increase their retirement savings, some employers have begun enrolling their employees automatically. With automatic enrollment, you don't fill out a form to opt into your company's retirement plan; you only fill out a form to opt out of it. At first glance, automatic enrollment sounds like a no-brainer--without doing anything, you're on your way to saving for retirement. But don't just assume that the investment decisions your employer has made on your behalf are right for you. Instead, take charge of your own...
Continue Reading »

Dec
21
Taxation of Investments
It's nice to own stocks, bonds, and other investments. Nice, that is, until it's time to fill out your federal income tax return. At that point, you may be left scratching your head. Just how do you report your investments and how are they taxed? Is it ordinary income or a capital gain? To determine how an investment vehicle is taxed in a given year, first ask yourself what went on with the investment that year. Did it generate interest income? If so, the income is probably considered ordinary. Did you sell the investment? If so, a capital gain or loss is probably involved. (Certain investments can generate both ordinary income and capital gain income, but we won't get into that here.) If you receive dividend income, it may be taxed...
Continue Reading »

Nov
09
Social Security claiming strategies for married couples
Prepared for: Save New Client Subtitle: Social Security Claiming Strategies for Married Couples Deciding when to begin receiving Social Security benefits is a major financial issue for anyone approaching retirement because the age at which you apply for benefits will affect the amount you'll receive. If you're married, this decision can be especially complicated because you and your spouse will need to plan together, taking into account the Social Security benefits you may each be entitled to. For example, married couples may qualify for retirement benefits based on their own earnings records, and/or for spousal benefits based on their spouse's earnings record. In addition, a surviving spouse may qualify for widow or widower's...
Continue Reading »

Nov
06
Will Social Security retire before you do?
People have traditionally seen Social Security benefits as the foundation of their retirement planning programs. The Social Security contributions deducted from workers' paychecks have, in effect, served as a government-enforced retirement savings plan. However, the Social Security system is under increasing strain. Better health care and longer life spans have resulted in an increasing number of people drawing Social Security benefits. As the baby boom generation (those born between 1946 and 1964) retires, even greater demands are being placed on the system. In 1950, there were 16.5 active workers to support each person receiving Social Security benefits. In 2015, there were only 2.8 workers supporting each Social Security beneficiary....
Continue Reading »

Oct
26
What are my options of I inherit an IRA or an employer retirement savings plan account?
If you don't want the money, you can always disclaim (refuse to accept) the inherited IRA or plan funds. But if you're like most people, you will want the money. Your first thought may be to take a lump-sum distribution, but that's usually not the best idea. Although a lump sum provides you with cash to meet expenses or invest elsewhere, it can also result in a huge income tax bill (in most cases, due all in one year). A lump-sum distribution also removes the funds from a tax-deferred environment. Fortunately, you probably have other alternatives. If you are the designated beneficiary (i.e., you are named as beneficiary in the IRA or plan documents), you can take distributions over your remaining life expectancy, which spreads the income...
Continue Reading »

Oct
05
Myths and Facts about Social Security
Myth: Social Security will provide most of the income you need in retirement. Fact: It's likely that Social Security will provide a smaller portion of retirement income than you expect. There's no doubt about it--Social Security is an important source of retirement income for most Americans. According to the Social Security Administration, more than nine out of ten individuals age 65 and older receive Social Security benefits. But it may be unwise to rely too heavily on Social Security, because to keep the system solvent, some changes will have to be made to it. The younger and wealthier you are, the more likely these changes will affect you. But whether retirement is years away or just around the corner, keep in mind that Social...
Continue Reading »

Sep
07
When I die, what will happen to my retirement plan benefits?
In general, your retirement plan benefits pass to the beneficiaries you designate on the plan beneficiary designation form. It is generally recommended that you designate beneficiaries, the percentage of the total that each will receive, and any backup beneficiaries on the plan beneficiary form. However, if you are married or have been married, your spouse or former spouse may have certain rights in your retirement benefits. If you have a large taxable estate (generally, over $5,490,000 in 2017), your retirement benefits could be subject to estate tax or generation-skipping transfer (GST) tax at your death. The GST tax may apply if you transfer your retirement benefits to someone who is two or more generations younger than you, such as...
Continue Reading »

Aug
31
Decisions, Decisions: Choosing Among Retirement Plan Contribution Types
If your employer-sponsored 401(k) or 403(b) plan offers pre-tax, Roth, and/or non-Roth after-tax contributions, which should you choose? How do you know which one might be appropriate for your needs? Start by understanding the features of each. Pre-tax: For those who want lower taxes now With pre-tax contributions, the money is deducted from your paycheck before taxes, which helps reduce your taxable income and the amount of taxes you pay now. Consider the following example, which is hypothetical and has been simplified for illustrative purposes. Frank earns $2,000 every two weeks before taxes. If he contributes nothing to his retirement plan on a pre-tax basis, the amount of his pay that will be subject to income taxes will be the...
Continue Reading »

Aug
24
Changing jobs? Know your 401k options
If you've lost your job, or are changing jobs, you may be wondering what to do with your 401(k) plan account. It's important to understand your options. What will I be entitled to? If you leave your job (voluntarily or involuntarily), you'll be entitled to a distribution of your vested balance. Your vested balance always includes your own contributions (pretax, after-tax, and Roth) and typically any investment earnings on those amounts. It also includes employer contributions (and earnings) that have satisfied your plan's vesting schedule. In general, you must be 100% vested in your employer's contributions after 3 years of service ("cliff vesting"), or you must vest gradually, 20% per year until you're fully vested after 6 years...
Continue Reading »

Jul
05
Can I deduct premiums paid for long-term care insurance (LTCI)?
It depends on several factors. Your LTCI contract must be a qualified one, you must itemize deductions on Schedule A of IRS Form 1040, and the total of your medical expenses (including your LTCI deduction) must exceed 10 percent of your adjusted gross income (AGI). Qualified LTCI premiums are deductible as medical expenses (subject to the 10 percent of AGI floor) within certain limits, based on your age. Note: Prior to 2013, the threshold to deduct medical expenses was 7.5 percent of adjusted gross income. The threshold remains 7.5 percent until 2017 for those age 65 or older. If you bought your policy before January 1, 1997, and it met the requirements of the state in which it was issued, it is automatically considered a qualified...
Continue Reading »

Jun
14
How much money should I save for retirement?
Generally speaking, as much as possible. You need to build a fund that you'll be able to draw on for much of your retirement income. Believe it or not, this may be possible if you start early and make smart choices. Contribute as much as you can to tax-advantaged savings vehicles (e.g., 401(k)s, IRAs, annuities). Then round out your retirement portfolio with other investments (e.g., stocks, bonds, mutual funds). As you're planning and saving, keep in mind that you may have 30 or more years of retirement to fund. So, you probably need an even bigger nest egg than you think. Before investing in a mutual fund, carefully consider its investment objectives, risks, fees, and expenses, which are contained in the prospectus available from the...
Continue Reading »

May
23
Is student loan interest deductible?
You may be able to deduct all or part of the student loan interest you've paid during the year, assuming you meet the requirements. You may be able to deduct up to $2,500 each year from your gross income if you've paid interest on a qualified education loan for qualified higher education expenses during the year. To be eligible for the deduction, your modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) must fall below a threshold figure. For 2017, the deduction begins to phase out as your MAGI exceeds $65,000 if you're single or $135,000 if you're married and file jointly. It phases out completely when your MAGI exceeds $80,000 ($165,000 for married persons filing jointly). These amounts are indexed for inflation. No deduction is allowed if your filing...
Continue Reading »

Sep
19
Weighing the Choice between Taxable and Tax-Free Bonds
Tags: taxes
If you sell a municipal bond at a profit, you could incur capital gains taxes. Also, the principal value of bonds may fluctuate with market conditions. Bonds redeemed prior to maturity may be worth more or less than their original cost. And remember that municipal bond funds are subject to the same inflation, interest-rate, and credit risks associated with their underlying bonds. As interest rates rise, bond prices typically fall, which can adversely affect a bond fund's performance. If you're considering the purchase of an individual bond or even a bond mutual fund, one of your first concerns will be its yield. However, when comparing various yields, you need to make sure you're not comparing apples to oranges. The yield on a...
Continue Reading »

May
09
Tax Benefits of Home Ownership
Tags: taxes
In tax lingo, your principal residence is the place where you legally reside. It's typically the place where you spend most of your time, but several other factors are also relevant in determining your principal residence. Many of the tax benefits associated with home ownership apply mainly to your principal residence--different rules apply to second homes and investment properties. Here's what you need to know to make owning a home really pay off at tax time. Deducting mortgage interest One of the most important tax benefits that comes with owning a home is the fact that you may be able to deduct any mortgage interest that you pay. If you itemize deductions on Schedule A of your federal income tax return, you can generally deduct the...
Continue Reading »

Apr
12
Education Tax Credits and Deductions
Tags: taxes
Tax credit vs. tax deduction A tax credit is more valuable than a tax deduction of the same amount. Why? A tax credit reduces any taxes owed on a dollar-for-dollar basis, whereas a tax deduction simply reduces the total income on which your taxes are based. For parents and students trying to manage college bills and student loan payments, the federal government offers education-related tax benefits. The requirements for each are different, so here's what you need to know. American Opportunity credit The American Opportunity credit (formerly the Hope credit) is a tax credit available for the first four years of a student's undergraduate education, provided the student is attending school at least half-time in a program leading to a...
Continue Reading »

Mar
21
Am I Having Enough Withheld?
Tags: taxes
If you fail to estimate your federal income tax withholding properly, it may cost you in a variety of ways. If you receive an income tax refund, it essentially means that you provided the IRS with an interest-free loan during the year. By comparison, if you owe taxes when you file your return, you may have to scramble for cash at tax time--and possibly owe interest and penalties to the IRS as well. When determining the correct withholding amount for your salary or wages, your objective should be to have just enough taxes withheld to prevent you from incurring penalties when your tax return is due. (You may owe some money at the time you file your return, but it shouldn't be much.) You can accomplish this by reading and understanding IRS...
Continue Reading »

Jan
25
Help! I Can't Pay My Tax Bill
Tags: taxes
You're almost done with your federal income tax return, and you're already thinking of ways to spend your refund. Then, the unthinkable happens--instead of a refund, you find that you owe $3,000. Or perhaps you've just received an IRS notice in the mail claiming that you owe $9,000 for the retirement plan distribution you took two years ago. You thought it was tax free at the time. Whatever the reason, you're now in the unenviable position of owing money to the IRS--and you don't have the cash. What do you do now? First, don't panic. You have several options. That said, however, don't put your head in the sand. The IRS won't go away, and the amount you owe will only grow larger if you procrastinate. If you ignore your tax bill entirely,...
Continue Reading »

Jan
05
Income Tax Planning and 529 Plans
Tags: taxes
The income tax benefits offered by 529 plans make these plans attractive to parents (and others) interested in saving for college. Qualified withdrawals from a 529 plan are tax free at the federal level, and some states also offer tax breaks to their residents. It's important to evaluate the federal and state tax consequences of plan withdrawals and contributions before you invest in a 529 plan. Federal income tax treatment of qualified withdrawals There are two types of 529 plans--college savings plans and prepaid tuition plans. The federal income tax treatment of these plans is identical. Your contributions to college savings plans and prepaid tuition plans are tax deferred. This means that you don't pay income taxes on the plan's...
Continue Reading »

Nov
23
Personal Deduction Planning
Tags: taxes
Taxes, like death, are inevitable. But why pay more than you have to? The trick to minimizing your federal income tax liability is to understand the rules and make the most of your tax planning opportunities. Personal deduction planning is one aspect of tax planning. Here, your goals are to use your deductions in the most efficient manner and take all deductions to which you're entitled. Deductions lower your taxable income Your first step is to understand how deductions work. You subtract certain deductions from your total income to arrive at your adjusted gross income (AGI); these deductions are commonly referred to as adjustments to income or as "above-the-line" deductions. Then, you subtract other deductions and exemptions from your...
Continue Reading »

Oct
27
Taxation of Investments
Tags: taxes
It's nice to own stocks, bonds, and other investments. Nice, that is, until it's time to fill out your federal income tax return. At that point, you may be left scratching your head. Just how do you report your investments and how are they taxed? Is it ordinary income or a capital gain? To determine how an investment vehicle is taxed in a given year, first ask yourself what went on with the investment that year. Did it generate interest income? If so, the income is probably considered ordinary. Did you sell the investment? If so, a capital gain or loss is probably involved. (Certain investments can generate both ordinary income and capital gain income, but we won't get into that here.) If you receive dividend income, it may be taxed...
Continue Reading »


RECENT POSTSCATEGORIES
Tell A Friend Tell A Friend
Connect with us on: Go to LinkedIn  Go to Facebook  Go to Twitter  


 
 
 

Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc. does not provide investment, tax, or legal advice. The information presented here is not specific to any individual's personal circumstances.

To the extent that this material concerns tax matters, it is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, by a taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed by law. Each taxpayer should seek independent advice from a tax professional based on his or her individual circumstances.

These materials are provided for general information and educational purposes based upon publicly available information from sources believed to be reliable—we cannot assure the accuracy or completeness of these materials. The information in these materials may change at any time and without notice.

Terry L. Jordan is a Investment Advisor Representative who is a Michigan resident. An Investment Advisor Representative may only discuss/and or transact securities business with residents of the following states: Michigan, Arizona, Florida, Indiana, and Washington.

Securities and advisory services offered through Woodbury Financial Services, Inc., Member FINRA, SIPC. Insurance offered through Jordan Financial & Associates which is not affiliated with Woodbury Financial Services, Inc. 



This communication is strictly intended for individuals residing in the state(s) of AZ, FL, ID, IN, MI and WA. No offers may be made or accepted from any resident outside the specific states referenced.
 


Check the background of this financial professional on FINRA's BrokerCheck.